Nashville Has Plenty to Discover 4


Berrien County has several agritourism sites like Horse Creek Winery, which specializes in crafting smooth wines from the 40-acre family-owned vineyard. Photo contributed

Small towns like Nashville offer city dwellers an escape from the crowds and are a perfect place to slow down and unwind.

A classical rural community, Nashville’s charm captivates visitors with its surrounding agricultural landscape and sites from years gone by, including several on the National Register of Historic Places.

The centerpiece of Downtown Nashville is the stately Berrien County Courthouse, completed in 1898, and home to the Historical Museum, which is open weekday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.  The museum has been recognized by the Georgia Humanities as housing the best Georgia exhibits of the Smithsonian Institute 2013 “Roots Music” and the 2016 “Hometown Teams” tours to small communities with a population of fewer than 20,000 people.

Historical sites also include the Old Berrien County Jail and the Harrison/Taylor Home. In addition, the Alapaha Colored School was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2002 and is one of the last surviving two-story wood-frame African-American school buildings in Georgia.

Walk around the downtown square and explore locally-owned shops like Ada Faye Fashions, Ageless Creations, Danforth Family Farms Country Store, Southern Landmark, and Shoppes on Davis. Then, unleash your inner-artistic passion at Art’s Afire, a paint-your-own pottery studio for walk-in and parties.

Providing delicious family-friendly cuisine, Nashville’s downtown and the surrounding area offer multiple dining options. To name a few: Brooks Steakhouse, Georgia Smokehouse, China Garden, The Brown Bag, Off the Hook Seafood Grill, Rancho Alegre, Puerta del Sol, Marvin’s Café, J and V Log Cabin, O’Neels Country Buffet, Barry’s Deli, and Ray’s Mill Pond.

A trip to Nashville is not complete without a stop at the Nashville Farmers Market. Located just a few blocks from the downtown square, visitors quickly discover this is not your average farmers market. More like a country store, the indoor market offers an expanded selection of farm-fresh fruits and vegetables, along with homemade pies and cakes, jams and jellies, artesian crafts, and a selection of books by regional authors.

Home to the new Azalea Sprinter train, where people are transported throughout the South Georgia region. Leaving from the Nashville Farmers Market, the train’s primary route is a scenic 34-mile journey through woodlands before crossing the Alapaha River on its way to nearby Willacoochee. Check the train’s schedule and reserve seats early for the “Dinner on the Rail” excursion. Presenting a leisurely ride as a delicious meal is served as the train stops on the trestle overlooking the river.

Take time to venture outside the Nashville area, where Berrien County has several agritourism sites like Horse Creek Winery. Specializing in crafting smooth wines from the 40-acre family-owned vineyard. Tours and wine tastings are available from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday. In addition, the Horse Creek Bistro has a wine tasting room, with light meal options, and nightly entertainment in nearby Sparks. Visitors can purchase Horse Creek’s award-winning wines, along with Georgia Grown products.

Departing from the Nashville Farmer’s Market, the Azalea Sprinter features “Dinner on the Rail” excursions. Photo contributed

If agritourism is your interest, head over to Ray City to Little Duck Farms, part of Dorsey Farms, which produces pecans and American grass-fed approved pasture-raised beef. The on-site store is open October through January, and Little Duck products are available year-round at various retail locations.

Southern Grace Farms is a traditional row crop farm offering u-pick (or they pick) strawberries, blackberries, blueberries, peaches, sunflowers, and more. The country store offers popular Georgia Grown products like jams, jellies, sauces, and candies. Perfect stop for families, the farm has a repurposed playground and serves homemade soft serve ice cream and slushies.

Plan to stay overnight at Our Place Hotel or Southern Landing, Nashville’s new Airbnb, both located in the downtown area and within walking distance of shops, restaurants, and boarding for the Azalea Sprinter.

Perfect for short stays, Southern Landing features a studio loft with a vintage farmhouse feel and includes a king-size bed, a luxurious bathroom fitted with an antique sink and rainfall shower, and a mini-kitchen complete with stove and refrigerator.

 

 

 

 


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4 thoughts on “Nashville Has Plenty to Discover

  • Bryan Shaw

    Your introductory paragraph “The centerpiece of Downtown Nashville is the stately Berrien County Courthouse, completed in 1898.” should have made this special point: The Courthouse contains the Best small town Historical Museum in Georgia. It has been recognized by the Georgia Humanities as housing the best Georgia exhibits of the Smithsonian Institute 2013 “Roots Music” and the 2016 “Hometown Teams” tours to small communities under 20,000 population. Nashville is only 5,000 population. Berrien County historical exhibits and archive are open weekdays, 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    Bryan Shaw, Curator
    Berrien County Historical Museum and Archive

    • Thressea Boyd Post author

      Bryan, thanks for the information about the Historical Museum. I will certainly add this information to the web version of the article and mention it in upcoming social media posts focused on the Nashville article. All the best, Thressea Boyd, editor.

  • Christi Williams

    I’m confused as to why several family eateries were left out of this article. J and V Log Cabin, O’Neels Country Buffet, and Barry’s Deli. I am an employee of Barry’s Deli and we have been a triving restaurant in the heart of Nashville of 16 years now!

    • Thressea Boyd Post author

      Christi,

      Thanks for letting us know about these restaurants. We will add them to the online version of the article. All the best, Thressea Boyd, editor.